Why visit Canada?

Canada is a country in North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world’s second-largest country by total area. Ottawa is Canada’s capital. Canada is an increasingly diverse country—data from the 2016 Census indicated that 22.3% of the population were designated as belonging to one or more visible minority groups. Through population projections from 2017, Statistics Canada projects that this percentage would rise to between 31.2% and 35.9% by 2036.


When you think of Canada, the first things you’ll think of will usually be its natural beauty, maple syrup and national parks. They’re known worldwide for being great at hockey, having cold winters, and maple syrup. … All of these things and a lot more make Canada what it is.”

What to see in Canada?

The CN Tower– is a 553.3 m-high concrete communications and observation tower located in the downtown core of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Built on the former Railway Lands, it was completed in 1976. Its name “CN” originally referred to Canadian National, the railway company that built the tower. Following the railway’s decision to divest non-core freight railway assets prior to the company’s privatization in 1995, it transferred the tower to the Canada Lands Company, a federal Crown corporation responsible for real estate development. The CN Tower held the record for the world’s tallest free-standing structure for 32 years until 2007 when it was surpassed by the Burj Khalifa, and was the world’s tallest tower until 2009 when it was surpassed by the Canton Tower. It is now the ninth tallest free-standing structure in the world and remains the tallest free-standing structure on land in the Western Hemisphere. In 1995, the CN Tower was declared one of the modern Seven Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. It also belongs to the World Federation of Great Towers.

Stanley Park– is a 405-hectare public park in British Columbia, Canada that makes up the northwestern half of Vancouver’s Downtown Peninsula, surrounded by waters of Burrard Inlet and English Bay. The park borders the neighbourhoods of West End and Coal Harbour to its southeast, and is connected to the North Shore via the Lions Gate Bridge. The historic lighthouse on Brockton Point marks the park’s easternmost point. While it is not the largest of its kind, Stanley Park is about one-fifth larger than New York City’s 340-hectare Central Park and almost half the size of London’s 960-hectare Richmond Park. Stanley Park has a long history. The land was originally used by Indigenous peoples for thousands of years before British Columbia was colonized by the British during the 1858 Fraser Canyon Gold Rush and was one of the first areas to be explored in the city. For many years after colonization, the future park with its abundant resources would also be home to non-Indigenous settlers. The land was later turned into Vancouver’s first park when the city incorporated in 1886.

Moraine Lake– is a glacially fed lake in Banff National Park, 14 kilometres outside the village of Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada. It is situated in the Valley of the Ten Peaks, at an elevation of approximately 1,884 metres. The lake has a surface area of 50 hectares. The lake, being glacially fed, does not reach its crest until middle to late June. When it is full, it reflects a distinctive shade of azure blue. The unique colour is due to the refraction of light off the rock flour deposited in the lake on a continual basis by surrounding glaciers.

The Fairmont Banff Springs– formerly and commonly known as the Banff Springs Hotel, is a historic hotel located in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The entire town including the hotel, is situated in Banff National Park, a national park managed by Parks Canada. The hotel overlooks a valley towards Mount Rundle, both of which are situated within the Rocky Mountain mountain range. The hotel is located at an altitude of 1,414 metres. The hotel opened in 1888 by the Canadian Pacific Railway, as one of the earliest of Canada’s grand railway hotels. The hotel property has undergone several stages of growth and redevelopment. The original hotel structure was designed by Bruce Price, with another structure completed in 1914. In 1926, a fire destroyed the original structure on the hotel property, although a replacement structure was later completed in 1928. The building was designated as a National Historic Site of Canada in 1988. The hotel property is presently managed by Fairmont Hotels and Resorts.

The Fairmont Le Château Frontenac– formerly and commonly referred to as the Château Frontenac, is a historic hotel in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. The hotel is situated in Old Quebec, within the historic district’s Upper Town, on the southern side of Place d’Armes. The Château Frontenac was designed by Bruce Price, and was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway company. The hotel is presently managed by Fairmont Hotels and Resorts. Opened in 1893, the Châteauesque-styled building has 18 floors; its 79.9-metre height is augmented by the 54 m elevation it sits at. It is one of the first completed grand railway hotels, and was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1981. The hotel was expanded on three occasions, with the last major expansion taking place in 1993. 

Fairmont Le Château Frontenac
https://www.fairmont.com/frontenac-quebec/?

The Capilano Suspension Bridge– is a simple suspension bridge crossing the Capilano River in the District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The current bridge is 140 metres long and 70 metres above the river. It is part of a private facility with an admission fee, and draws over 1.2 million visitors per year.

Lake Louise– is a glacial lake within Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada. It is located 5 km west of the Hamlet of Lake Louise and the Trans-Canada Highway. Lake Louise is named after the Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and the wife of the Marquess of Lorne, who was the Governor General of Canada from 1878 to 1883. The turquoise colour of the water comes from rock flour carried into the lake by melt-water from the glaciers that overlook the lake. The lake has a surface of 0.8 km² and is drained through the 3 km long Louise Creek into the Bow River. Fairmont’s Chateau Lake Louise, one of Canada’s grand railway hotels, is located on Lake Louise’s eastern shore. It is a luxury resort hotel built in the early decades of the 20th century by the Canadian Pacific Railway. Moraine Lake and Lake Agnes are also accessible from Lake Louise.

Jasper National Park– is a national park in Alberta, Canada. It is the largest national park within Alberta’s Rocky Mountains spanning 11,000 km². Its location is north of Banff National Park and west of Edmonton. The park contains the glaciers of the Columbia Icefield, springs, lakes, waterfalls and mountains.

Algonquin Provincial Park– is a provincial park located between Georgian Bay and the Ottawa River in Ontario, Canada, mostly within the Unorganized South Part of Nipissing District. Established in 1893, it is the oldest provincial park in Canada. Additions since its creation have increased the park to its current size of about 7,653 square kilometres. The park is contiguous with several smaller, administratively separate provincial parks that protect important rivers in the area, resulting in a larger total protected area. Its size, combined with its proximity to the major urban centres of Toronto and Ottawa, makes Algonquin one of the most popular provincial parks in the province and the country. Highway 60 runs through the south end of the park, while the Trans-Canada Highway bypasses it to the north. Over 2,400 lakes and 1,200 kilometres of streams and rivers are located within the park. Some notable examples include Canoe Lake and the Petawawa, Nipissing, Amable du Fond, Madawaska, and Tim rivers. These were formed by the retreat of the glaciers during the last ice age. The park is considered part of the “border” between Northern Ontario and Southern Ontario.

The Toronto Islands– called Mnisiing, meaning “on the islands”, by the Michi Saagiig Anishinaabeg, and formerly Aiionwatha or Hiawatha’s Island by early European settlers—are a chain of 15 small islands in Lake Ontario, south of mainland Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Comprising the only group of islands in the western part of Lake Ontario, the Toronto Islands are located just offshore from the city’s downtown area, provide shelter for Toronto Harbour, and separate Toronto from the rest of Lake Ontario. The islands are home to the Toronto Island Park, the Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, several private yacht clubs, a public marina, Centreville Amusement Park, a year round residential neighbourhood, and several public beaches. The island community is the largest urban car-free community in North America. All access to the Islands is by water, by City of Toronto ferries operating all year from Jack Layton Ferry Terminal at the foot of Bay Street or privately operated water taxis during the months of May to September. The Toronto Islands are a popular tourist and recreational destination. Bicycles are accommodated on the ferries at no charge and can be rented at Centre Island.

Hope you enjoyed the post. Thank You!

Our email to plan your trip, work together and more…

staceplores@gmail.com

Stacey M.

(Travel & Tourism Specialist)

Published by staceplores

StacePlores is a blog that helps people to discover and explore the world in diferrent ways, through travel, food, culture, destinations, start something new like a blog, start a business, etc... The key point is to always do something that you love and enjoy to don't have fear of trying new things...

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